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Common Bridal Veil Styles

By: Phineas Gray
Category : Shopping
February 5, 2013

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phineas gray
Email : phineas.gray@gmail.com

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Just as there are many styles and trends in wedding dresses and accessories from which a bride much choose, so too are her options for the ideal wedding veil varied. It can be overwhelming at first for a bride to be to understand the various terminology surrounding veil selections so use this article as a primer to help you identify your options. Certainly the two main categories of Wedding veil are short and long and in each arena, there are different sub-categories or variations.

The shortest veil style is known as the bouffant and was at the height of its popularity in the 1960s. Today it is most commonly worn with a very simple gown or it is also popular with brides with very short hair cuts as its length generally ends at the top of the shoulder. For a slightly longer style yet still not overly flowing, some brides may opt for the shoulder wedding veil as it extends just below the shoulder line, near the top of the armpit. Yet another veil style is the elbow veil. As the name would suggest, this veil extends to the elbow line and is quite flattering for strapless wedding gowns.

A moderate length of wedding veil is the waist veil. Very similar to the elbow, it goes a few inches lower to the bride’s waist and is ideally suited to more petite brides so as not to be overwhelming on them. Continuing on down is the fingertip veil followed by the knee veil. The lengths of each of these styles is evident by their names and the fingertip works well for larger bridges as it tends to shape and slightly hide the hip area where the knee length veil is best paired with a tea length wedding dress or any other less formal style of gown.

The three longest styles are the waltz, chapel and the cathedral. The waltz veil just barely skims the floor or even stops just shy of the floor, based upon the gown length and bride height. The chapel is the first style to have a train and is usually 108” long. For brides that prefer more train, the cathedral style is 144” in length and is the most formal of all.

A blusher veil can be a twist on any other veil, short or long. The term “blusher” simply indicates that the veil comes forward and covers the face. The blusher portion of a veil is typically eighteen inches in length. No matter what your preferred style of wedding veil, it is helpful to know the terms so that you can make the best use of your shopping time.


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